THE DOLOROUS (SORROWFUL) PASSION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST.All the books free online.

FROM THE MEDITATIONS OF

ANNE CATHERINE EMMERICH


ANNE CATHERINE EMMERICH

Blessed  Anne Catherine Emmerich (1774-1824)
Mystic, Stigmatist, Visionary, and Prophet

THE DOLOROUS PASSION OF
OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST

NIHIL OBSTAT:  GEORGIVS D. SMITH. D.D.

CENSOR DEPVTATVS

IMPRIMATUR:  EDM. CAN. SVRMONT

VICARIVS GENERALIS

WESTMONASTERII, DIE XXI MAII MCMXXVIII

ONE VOLUME

AND

THE FOUR VOLUME WORK:

THE LOWLY LIFE AND BITTER PASSION
OF
OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST
AND
HIS BLESSED MOTHER
TOGETHER WITH
THE MYSTERIES OF THE OLD TESTAMENT
FROM THE
VISIONS OF BLESSED ANNE CATHERINE EMMERICH
As Recorded in the Journal of Clement Brentano
AND EDITED BY
VERY REV. C.E. SCHMOGER, C. SS. R.
1914

NIHIL OBSTAT
Brugis, 25 Martii, 1914.
Em. De Jaegher,
Can., lib.cens.

IMPRIMATUR.
Brugis, 27 Martii, 1914.
A.C. DE SCHREVEL
vic. gen.

When the visions of the Passion were concluded, Jesus fell on his face like one at the point of death; the angels disappeared, and the bloody sweat became more copious, so that I saw it had soaked his garment. Entire darkness reigned in the cavern, when I beheld an angel descend to Jesus. This angel was of higher stature than any whom I had before beheld, and his form was also more distinct and more resembling that of a man. He was clothed like a priest in a long floating garment, and bore before him, in his hands, a small vase, in shape resembling the chalice used at the Last Supper. At the top of this chalice, there was a small oval body, about the size of a bean, and which diffused a reddish light. The angel, without touching the earth with his feet, stretched forth his right hand to Jesus, who arose, when he placed the mysterious food in his mouth, and gave him to drink from the luminous chalice. Then he disappeared.

120

    Jesus having freely accepted the chalice of his sufferings, and received new strength, remained some minutes longer in the grotto, absorbed in calm meditation, and returning thanks to his Heavenly Father. He was still in deep affliction of spirit, but supernaturally comforted to such a degree as to be able to go to his disciples without tottering as he walked, or bending beneath the weight of his sufferings. His countenance was still pale and altered, but his step was firm and determined. He had wiped his face with a linen cloth, and rearranged his hair, which hung about his shoulders, matted together and damp with blood.

    When Jesus came to his disciples, they were lying, as before, against the wall of the terrace, asleep, and with their heads covered. Our Lord told them that then was not the time for sleep, but that they should arise and pray: ‘Behold the hour is at hand, and the Son of Man shall be betrayed into the hands of sinners,’ he said: ‘Arise, let us go, behold he is at hand that will betray me. It were better for him, if that man had not been born.’ The Apostles arose in much alarm, and looked round with anxiety. When they had somewhat recovered themselves, Peter said warmly: ‘Lord, I will call the others, that so we may defend thee.’ But Jesus pointed out to them at some distance in the valley, on the other side of the Brook of Cedron, a band of armed men, who were advancing with torches, and he said that one of their number had betrayed him. He spoke calmly, exhorted them to console his Mother, and said: ‘Let us go to meet them—I shall deliver myself up without resistance into the hands of my enemies.’ He then left the Garden of Olives with the three Apostles, and went to meet the archers on the road which led from that garden to Gethsemani.

    When the Blessed Virgin, under the care of Magdalen and Salome, recovered her senses, some disciples, who had seen the soldiers approaching, conducted her back to the house of Mary, the mother of Mark. The archers took a shorter road than that which Jesus followed when he left the supper-room.

121

    The grotto in which Jesus had this day prayed was not the one where he usually prayed on Mount Olivet. He commonly went to a cabin at a greater distance off, where, one day, after having cursed the barren fig-tree, he had prayed in great affliction of spirit, with his arms stretched out, and leaning against a rock.

    The traces of his body and hands remained impressed on the stone, and were honoured later, but it was not known on what occasion the miracle had taken place. I have several times seen similar impressions left upon the stone, either by the Prophets of the Old Testament, or by Jesus, Mary, or some of the Apostles, and I have also seen those made by the body of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai. These impressions do not seem deep, but resemble what would be made upon a thick piece of dough, if a person leaned his hand upon it.

 

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